Tuesday, 18 July 2017

Web of Science update

If you use our journal citation database Web of Science, then you might be interested to find out about some exciting new developments https://clarivate.com/blog/whats-new-in-web-of-science/

Useful websites

Here's 10 websites to inform, amaze, amuse and entertain from Internet Guru Phil Bradley. We particularly like Storyzy which allows you to check fake news and quotes https://youtu.be/l3pTeFnTR38

Monday, 17 July 2017

IEEE referencing

It is now possible to create references in the IEEE style when you use Summon, in addition to Harvard, APA and MLA referencing styles.
Good news for our Design Engineering students.




Using everyday materials to make scientific equipment.....no electricity required.

Inventor Manu Prakash turns everyday materials into powerful scientific devices, from paper microscopes to a clever new mosquito tracker. From the TED Fellows stage, he demos Paperfuge, a hand-powered centrifuge inspired by a spinning toy that costs 20 cents to make and can do the work of a $1,000 machine, no electricity required.

Thursday, 29 June 2017

31st British Human Computer Interaction Conference




The 31st British Human Computer Interaction Conference will be held in July at the University of Sunderland. The conference is organised by the HCI research groups at the University of Sunderland and Edinburgh Napier University in conjunction with the Interaction Specialist Group of BCS.

 

The BCS HCI 2017 conference theme is digital make-believe. Make-believe refers to our expansive, “what-if” thinking typical of HCI and is pervasive. For example, we make-believe when we design innovative technology;
we make-believe when we immerse ourselves in a computer game or virtual world; and we make-believe when we evaluate and refine new technology by imagining ourselves using it

 

At HCI 2017 we want to engage researchers, practitioners, creative businesses, makers, artists and developers in exploring, inspiring, creating and evaluating digital make-believe in topic areas both within and outside HCI.
We are calling for submissions from all areas of HCI and particularly encourage submissions on digital make believe from philosophy to practice to research

 

Follow us @bhci17

 

3rd – 6th July 2017

Sunderland, UK

Monday, 12 June 2017

Whats On: British Human Computer Interaction Conference


31st British Human Computer Interaction Conference

 

 

The 31st British Human Computer Interaction Conference will be held in July at the University of Sunderland. The conference is organised by the HCI research groups at the University of Sunderland and Edinburgh Napier University in conjunction with the Interaction Specialist Group of BCS.

 

The BCS HCI 2017 conference theme is digital make-believe. Make-believe refers to our expansive, “what-if” thinking typical of HCI and is pervasive. For example, we make-believe when we design innovative technology; we make-believe when we immerse ourselves in a computer game or virtual world; and we make-believe when we evaluate and refine new technology by imagining ourselves using it

 

At HCI 2017 we want to engage researchers, practitioners, creative businesses, makers, artists and developers in exploring, inspiring, creating and evaluating digital make-believe in topic areas both within and outside HCI. We are calling for submissions from all areas of HCI and particularly encourage submissions on digital make believe from philosophy to practice to research

 

Follow us @bhci17

 

3rd – 6th July 2017

Sunderland, UK

 


 

Tuesday 4th July


The main conference begins on the 4th of July, with a keynote speech by Prof Beryl Graham to open the conference.

09.00-12.00
Morning workshops
Marc Fabri and Paul Doney
 
Nigel Bevan and Martin Maguire
 
11.00-12.30
Posters
Interactions Gallery (set up and first views)
12.00-12.30
Lunch
12.30-14.00
Conference Opening – Keynote: Beryl Graham
14.00-15.30
Paper Session
SME Panel: Forward thinking UXD – where are we going to be in 3 months and 3 years
15.30-16.00
Coffee
16.00-17.00
Paper Session
 Digital Catapult Session
17.00-17.45
Keynote: Timandra Harkness
18.30-late
Fish & Chips at the Software City


Wednesday 5th July


09.00-10.30
Paper Session
Maker Event Pop-Up Exhibit
10.30-11.00
Coffee
Posters
11.00-12.30
Paper Session
Creative Fuse NE – Interactive Session – Fusion and Innovation in the Creative Sector: creatives, SME cross-over in the UX area
12.30-13.00
Lunch
Interactions Gallery
13.00-14.30
Paper Session
Creative Fuse NE – Interactive Session – Fusion and Innovation in the Creative Sector: creatives, SME cross-over in the UX area
14.30-15.00
Coffee
Posters
15.00-16.00
Paper Session
16.00-17.00
Paper Session
Panel & Lightening Talks: SME, Practitioner and Freelance Perspectives, Views and Experiences of HCI/UXD
18.30-late
Conference Dinner at the National Glass Centre


Thursday 6th July


09.00-10.30
Paper Session
HCI at the Final Frontier
10.30-11.00
Coffee
11.00-12.30
Paper Session
Interactive Session: Innovation in the HCI/Creative crossover
12.30-13.00
Lunch
Interactions Gallery
13.00-14.00
Paper Session
Posters & Maker Event Hackumentary Screening
14.00-14.30
Coffee
14.30-16.00
Keynote – Elisabeth Andre & Conference Close

Thursday, 4 May 2017

Sample of the month: Sileather


Sileather is a faux leather made of silicone and developed in China.  It is made by combining raw material silicon resin with various non-woven fabrics to make an extremely durable, stretchy environmentally friendly product.

Sileather has many applications as it is pliable and weatherproof and can be used in exteriors and interiors ranging from hospitality to marine furnishings and healthcare.  It is also soft to touch and easy to clean.

 

This sample can be found in the Samples Library housed in our Materials Room in the Basement of the Library.


Find out more about our Special Collections: http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/specialcolls


Monday, 24 April 2017

2017 Lovelace Lecture


2017 Lovelace Lecture by Professor Andrew Blake, Alan Turing Institute

"Machines that learn to see"

Monday 8 May 2017  6:00 – 9:30pm

The Royal Society, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1Y 5AG

 

As part of the BCS 60th anniversary celebrations this Lovelace lecture is free of charge. 

logo.JPG


 

Andrew Blake

Andrew Blake.jpg

Bio

Andrew Blake is an engineer whose innovative work on image analysis has helped make it possible for computers to react to the world around them, based on the visual data they receive. His research has focused particularly on the accurate tracking of motion and the reconstruction of visible surfaces.

 

Amongst his contributions to the field, he is perhaps best known for the development of the Condensation algorithm that allowed computers to interpret complex visual motion in real time. At Microsoft Research Cambridge, Andrew was also part of the team that put the machine intelligence into the company’s Kinect controller — a revolutionary gaming system capable of following instructions dictated by the body movements of its users. 

 

The recipient of the Silver Medal and the MacRobert Gold Medal of the Royal Academy of Engineering, Andrew also won the prestigious Mountbatten Medal from the Institution of Engineering and Technology. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and of the Royal Society.

 

Abstract

 

Machine vision works nowadays. Machines can: navigate using vision; separate object from background; recognise a wide variety of objects, and track their motion. These abilities are great spin-offs in their own right, but are also part of an extended adventure in understanding the nature of intelligence through visual perception One general question about intelligent systems is whether they will be dominated by "generative" models which explain data as a sequence of transformations, or by black-box machines that are trained on data at ever greater scale? In perception systems this boils down to the comparative roles of two paradigms: analysis-by-synthesis versus empirical recognisers. Each approach has strengths, and empirical recognisers especially have made great strides in performance in the last few years, through deep learning. Exciting progress that has already been made on integrating the two approaches. It is also fascinating to speculate what other new paradigms in learning might transform the speed at which artificial perception can develop.

 

Registration and coffee- 6pm to 6:30pm

Lecture- 6:30pm to 8:30pm

Drinks Reception- 8:30pm to 9:30pm

 

Opening address     

                     

Professor Sir Timothy O'Shea FRSE

University of Edinburgh

Professor Sir Timothy O'Shea FRSE, Principal of the University of Edinburgh. A computer scientist, he is a graduate of the Universities of Sussex and Leeds. He became Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh in 2002. Professor O'Shea was awarded a Knighthood in the Queen's 2008 New Year's Honours List in recognition of his services to higher education. 

 

Chris Bishop, Laboratory Director at Microsoft Research Cambridge

Chris Bishop is also Professor of Computer Science at the University of Edinburgh and a fellow of Darwin College, Cambridge.

In 2004 he was elected Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, and in 2007 he was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Chris obtained a BA in Physics from Oxford, and a PhD in Theoretical Physics from the University of Edinburgh.