Thursday, 16 April 2015

Call for Participation: MobileHCI2015 Workshops



Call for Participation: MobileHCI2015 Workshops 

ACM  International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services 2015 (MobileHCI)

Copenhagen, Denmark, August 24-27 2015

Deadlines 
Position Paper Deadline: May 8th 2015, 5pm PST
Position Paper Notification: June 12th 2015
Workshop Day: August 24th 2015

For details of each workshop, visit:



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Workshop 1: 2nd Workshop on Designing with Older Adults: Towards a Complete Methodology
Workshop 2: From Mobile to Wearable – Using Wearable Devices to Enrich Mobile Interaction
Workshop 3: Workshop on Mobile Cognition - Using Mobile Devices to Enhance Human Cognition
Workshop 4: The Role of Self-Reflection in Sustainability
Workshop 5: Smarttention, Please! Intelligent Attention Management on Mobile Devices
Workshop 6: Interactive Displays through Mobile Projection
Workshop 7: Mobile Collocated Interactions With Wearables
Workshop 8: Mobiscool - 1st Workshop on Mobile, Social and Culturally Oriented Learning
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Workshop 1: 2nd Workshop on Designing with Older Adults: Towards a Complete Methodology

The ageing process can interfere considerably with the use of mobile devices (e.g., due to changes in vision, attention, and motor control), and designing mobile technology with older adults poses its own challenges. In the absence of a complete methodology for working with older users, researchers and designers are often left to improvise their own methods which can result in co-design relationships being compromised or lead to weak design insights emerging. How can we best adapt or modify existing methods for working with this group? This workshop will bring together researchers who design with older adults to share their experiences and discuss opportunities for adapting existing methods to suit the needs of these users.


Emma Nicol, Andreas Komninos, Marilyn McGee-Lennon, Mark Dunlop
The Mobiquitous Lab / University of Strathclyde 

Lynne Baillie
Interactive & Trustworthy Technologies Group / Glasgow Caledonian University 

Lilit Hakobyan, Jo Lumsden
Engineering and Applied Science / Aston University 

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Workshop 2: From Mobile to Wearable – Using Wearable Devices to Enrich Mobile Interaction

In the last decades, mobile phones have turned into sensor-rich devices that use different built-in sensors such as accelerometers or gyroscopes. The sensors have enriched the interaction possibilities, allowing, for example, gestural interaction. With the prevalence of wearable devices and peripherals, such as fitness bracelets and breast straps, the input and output possibilities can be further extended with both new sensors and actuators. Current applications could bene t from them, and entirely new applications could be designed. The design space for new applications needs to be identified, which will again drive advances in mobile and wearable computing. This workshop sets focus on wearable devices as means to enrich smartphones and their interaction capabilities. We will discuss the new design space and generate ideas of new applications. Furthermore, we will provide sensors and actuators allowing the participants to implement rapid prototypes of their novel application ideas.


Stefan Schneegass
Institute for Visualization andInteractive Systems / University of Stuttgart 

Thomas Olsson
Department of Pervasive Computing / Tampere University of Technology 

Sven Mayer
Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems / University of Stuttgart 

Kristof Van Laerhoven
Computer Science Department / University of Freiburg 

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Workshop 3: Workshop on Mobile Cognition - Using Mobile Devices to Enhance Human Cognition

With the mobile phone turning into a life-logging device alongside with the prevalence of wearables, people are able to record, store, and make sense of their daily activities. Using such insights, applications can help monitor physiological data, motivate behavior change, but also create new ways to aid human memory: mobile devices not only allow us to create records of information, but also present us with proactive reminders and instant access to information relevant to the current situation and context serving as cognition support and for retrospection. This workshop brings together practitioners, designers and researchers with the goal of exploring the requirements, challenges and possibilities of mobile cognition, i.e. how to track activities beyond the physical realm, make sense of that data and feed it back to the user in meaningful ways to augment human cognition.


Tilman Dingler
Institute for Visualization andInteractive Systems / University of Stuttgart 

Evangelos Niforatos
Ubiquitous Computing / University of Lugano 

Agon Bexheti
Ubiquitous Computing / University of Lugano 

Florian Alt
Media Informatics Group / University of Munich 

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Workshop 4: The Role of Self-Reflection in Sustainability

Sustainability is a major call of all research and applied services. Mobile technology can offer innovative ways to address sustainability issues. Self-reflection - in interviews or surveys - is a well-applied data collection method within HCI and provides affordances to observe and transform human behavior by bringing new awareness. While sustainability and self-reflection have been researched and addressed widely within the HCI field, the potential links between them (and how one can influence the other via technology) has yet to be explored within MobileHCI settings. This workshop brings together a cross-domain group of individuals to explore and discuss the role of self-reflection in sustainability. We want to generate new insights regarding mobileHCI technologies, design and methods that have direct sustainable impact in the world.


Genovefa Kefalidou
Human Factors Research Group / The University of Nottingham 

Anya Skatova, Vicky Shipp, Ben Bedwell
Horizon Digital Economy Research / University of Nottingham 

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Workshop 5: Smarttention, Please! Intelligent Attention Management on Mobile Devices

Today, many users of mobile devices are continuously confronted with a huge variety of information: notifications from Facebook, new application updates, won badges, or reminders. This leads to an information overload, which makes it hard to stay focussed. This workshop wants to investigate if smart attention management systems can be a solution and how such systems need to be designed. We welcome submissions that focus on the understanding of users and their current, mobile information handling. We further appreciate contributions that propose design concepts for the interaction with smart attention management systems. The expected workshop outcome is a summary of today’s most recent challenges in the design and development of smart attention management systems.


Benjamin Poppinga

Nuria Oliver, Martin Pielot
Telefonica Research 

Karen Church
Yahoo! Labs 

Niels Henze
Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems / University of Stuttgart 

Alireza Sahami
Yahoo! Labs 

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Workshop 6: Interactive Displays through Mobile Projection

Projectors shrink in size, are embedded in some mobile devices, and the next generation of mobile projections: drone-carried or wearable projectors are graspable. The technology may be ready for a radical change in mobile interaction towards personal projected displays that are (in contrast to the milestone work of Pinhanez) not limited to static setups, but the applications and interactions for such novel and exciting technologies are not designed yet. In this workshop, we raise the question to what extend mobile projections will change mobile interactions. In a hands-on workshop the participants will sketch interactions with mobile projectors. The ideated interaction concepts will be structured, analyzed, and discussed regarding their potential to extend the current limitations of mobile interaction, i.e. displaying content only on the embedded screen.


Katrin Wolf, Markus Funk, Pascal Knierim
Institute for Visualization and Interactive Systems / University of Stuttgart 

Markus Löchtefeld
DFKI Saarbrücken 

Sebastian Boring
University of Copenhagen 

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Workshop 7: Mobile Collocated Interactions With Wearables

Research on mobile collocated interactions has been looking at situations in which collocated users engage in collaborative activities using their mobile devices, thus going from personal/individual toward shared/multiuser experiences and interactions. However, computers are getting smaller, more powerful, and closer to our bodies. Therefore, mobile collocated interactions research, which originally looked at smartphones and tablets, will inevitably move towards fully integrated wearable technologies. The focus of this workshop is to bring together a community of researchers, designers and practitioners to explore the potential of extending mobile collocated interactions from, through and around the body using wearable technologies.


Andrés Lucero
Mads Clausen Institute / University of Southern Denmark 

Danielle Wilde
SDU Design / University of Southern Denmark 

Simon Robinson
Future Interaction Tech. Lab / Swansea University 

Joel E. Fischer
The Mixed Reality Lab / University of Nottingham 

James Clawson
Georgia Institute of Technology / School of Interactive Computing 

Oscar Tomico
Eindhoven University of Technology 

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Workshop 8: Mobiscool - 1st Workshop on Mobile, Social and Culturally Oriented Learning

There are two simultaneous transformative changes occurring in Education: the use of mobile and tablet devices for accessing educational content, and the rise of the MOOCs. Happening independently and in parallel are significant advances in interaction technologies through smartphones and tablets, and the rise in the use of social-media and social-network analytics in several domains. Given the extent of personal context that is available on the mobile device, how can the education experience be personalised, made social, and tailored to the cultural context of the learner? The goal of this workshop is twofold: (a) To understand the usage, and student behaviour in this new environment (MOOCS and mobile devices) and (b) To design experiments and implement them to make these new tools more effective by tailoring them to the individual student’s personal, social and cultural settings and preferences.


A. A. Nanavati, N. Rajput
IBM Research, India

M. Turunen
Dept. of Computer Science, / University of Tampere 

H. Knoche, M. Rehm
Department of Architecture, Design and Media Technology, Centre for Mobility and Urban Studies / Aalborg University, Denmark

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